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Center for South Asia

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October 2020

Panel Discussion – Caste, Indigeneity, Region, and Settler/Colonialism in Modi’s India

October 29 @ 3:00 pm - 4:30 pm
Zoom Webinar, 1155 Observatory Dr, Madison, WI 53706
Madison, WI 53706 United States

This panel considers the complex entanglement of caste, indigeneity, region, and settler/colonialisms under Hindutva rule in Modi’s India. Our work interrogates how caste crucially distinguishes Hindutva rule as an upper-caste project, the ways in which…

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South Asia Book Awards: Mitali Bose Perkins

October 29 @ 6:00 pm - 7:00 pm
1155 Observatory Dr, Madison, WI 53706
Madison, WI 53706 United States
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South Asia Book Awards Meet the Winners Discussion Series Mitali Bose Perkins, author of Forward Me Back to You

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November 2020

CSA Fall Lecture Series: Anna Schultz

November 5 @ 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Zoom Webinar, 1155 Observatory Dr, Madison, WI 53706
Madison, WI 53706 United States
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The first Jewish kirtan organization was founded in Bombay in 1880, and for the next forty years, kirtan arguably became the most important Marathi Jewish performance medium. Why would Jews adopt a performance form that had been attached to Hindu temple worship for 700 years? And how did they manage to transform it so that it would become not only accepted, but beloved, within the Bene Israel community? The Bene Israel are a deeply religious and observant Jewish community who adapted a Hindu cultural form strategically and performatively. It was no easy task to generate Jewish identity through Hindu song forms, but the socio-political climate of the late nineteenth century made it a project worth pursuing. Bene Israel kirtan tells a story of translation that includes and exceeds the adaptation of Hebrew texts into Marathi texts. By translating not only language, but also religious practices and musical styles, Bene Israel leaders negotiated an Indian Jewish voice vis-à-vis Hindus, Christian missionaries, Indian Christians and Muslims, and global Jewry.

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Language Alumni Panel: Post-Grad Planning

November 6 @ 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Zoom Webinar, 1155 Observatory Dr, Madison, WI 53706
Madison, WI 53706 United States
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Hear from UW-Madison alumni using their language and linguistic skills across industries domestically and abroad (entrepreneurship, marketing, global logistics, government, education). Hosted by UW-Madison Language Institute; Study Abroad-International Programs; Center for East Asian Studies; Latin…

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CSA Fall Lecture Series: Namita Wahi

November 12 @ 9:30 am - 10:30 am
Zoom Webinar, 1155 Observatory Dr, Madison, WI 53706
Madison, WI 53706 United States
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Please join us for a virtual lecture by Namita Wahi (Fellow, Centre for Policy Research, New Delhi). Topic TBA. Zoom access coming soon.

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South Asia Book Awards: Meenal Patel

November 12 @ 6:00 pm - 7:30 pm
1155 Observatory Dr, Madison, WI 53706
Madison, WI 53706 United States
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South Asia Book Awards Meet the Winners Discussion Series with Meenal Patel, author of Priya Dreams of Marigolds and Masala

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IRIS Book Club Virtual Meeting

November 16 @ 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Zoom Webinar, 1155 Observatory Dr, Madison, WI 53706
Madison, WI 53706 United States
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IRIS Book Club Virtual Meeting – The Night Diary by Veera Hiranandani Discussion led by Zara Chowdhary (Lecturer, Hindi, UW-Madison) Zoom access coming soon

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CSA Fall Lecture Series: Ramya Ramanath

November 19 @ 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Zoom Webinar, 1155 Observatory Dr, Madison, WI 53706
Madison, WI 53706 United States
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The contents of the built environment that silhouette an urban terrain may be nowhere more in flux than in Mumbai, India. In her book, A Place to Call Home: Women as Agents of Change in Mumbai, Ramya Ramanath, Associate Professor of International Public Service at DePaul University in Chicago, foregrounds experiences of a diverse group of 120 women recently displaced from the slums of Mumbai and resettled in high-rise public housing to show how a history of tumultuous urban planning decisions can help and hinder an under-heeded population of those who call the city home. Extracts of conversations with the women, documented at various stages in their pre- and post-resettlement experiences, richly illustrate the nuances and aspirations of their everyday lives to shade our understanding of personal, familial and extrafamilial change. Through four core chapters, the women recollect their first homes in the city’s slums followed by their responses to the forced disruption from massive government-led demolitions, their negotiations with state and non-state actors, and their eventual move into secure high-rise housing. The book concludes with descriptions of how they are proactively reconstructing their post-settlement lives and livelihoods and advocating for reconsideration of their new surroundings and ways of life. Their call for the full, continual and differentiated engagement of their ideas and actions has implications for future planning, design, monitoring, and evaluation of place-making processes, particularly now when the exigency to build a more inclusive, viable and homey life is felt in neighborhoods and cities across the globe.

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South Asia Book Awards: Padma Venaktraman

November 19 @ 6:00 pm - 7:30 pm
1155 Observatory Dr, Madison, WI 53706
Madison, WI 53706 United States
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South Asia Book Awards Meet the Winners Discussion Series with Padma Venaktraman, author of The Bridge Home

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December 2020

CSA Fall Lecture Series: Vasugi Kailasam

December 3 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
Zoom Webinar, 1155 Observatory Dr, Madison, WI 53706
Madison, WI 53706 United States
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Through this talk, I want to trace the mobile genre of the “refugee narrative” in Sri Lankan Tamil writing. By looking at the Sri Lankan Tamil novel Mmm written by the author Shoba Shakthi, translated into English as Traitor, this talk examines if the Tamil refugee narrative can embody ideas of displacement and belonging in terms of both thematic and formal elements which might, in turn contribute to the creation of a uniquely Sri Lankan subjecthood that can frame discourses of statehood and reconciliation.

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